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Catch the Koosh Ball

In this energizing activity, players throw and catch a large koosh ball as they ask or answer questions relating to leadership.ObjectiveTo review key concepts or information.To have fun.Activity training methods MovementDiscussionMaterials RequiredBuy a Koosh ball, or a soft rubber ball approximately the size of a baseball.
 

Chat on the Move

This activity is useful after meals, as it provides a proper physical exercise during which one review what has been learned and surveys what other leadership competencies will be presentedObjectiveTo review what participants have learned so far in the workshop.To explore areas or aspects that still need to be coveredTo provide physical exercise and a good chance to reenergize.
 

The Exhibiton Gallery

This activity provides participants with an opportunity to highlight their strengths or competencies that would be useful to others. Each participant prepares an exhibit banner that showcases the thrust of his or her idea. Everybody is encouraged to walk from display to display and identify those people with whom they might interact with at a later time.
 

The Leadership Puzzle Activity

This activity embodies visual imagery and encourages the leadership activity participants to use a symbol to represent their leadership program.ObjectiveTo create a symbol for everything participants learn and to understand how it all fits together.To show how ritual and memory joggers can be used to fortify what has been learned and help make learning a continuous process.
 

Make time to “Journal” activity

This team-building activity introduces the idea of journal writing and provides a reflection opportunity that participants can acknowledge what they have learned and how they will continue challenging themselves.
 

Narrate your story and emphasize your point activity

Storytelling is a useful leadership capacity; this activity provides a way to exercise for the participants.ObjectiveTo recognize the significance of storytelling as a leadership trait.To illustrate how to tell a story.To practice telling a story.
 

Get in touch with my leader

By writing a poem as a way to expand one’s creativity, leadership concepts are explored and encouraged.ObjectiveTo get participants to focus on the topic of leadership.Giving participants a chance to become acquainted and begin working together.Stimulating creative thinking.
 

Rhyme with 'Leader' Activity

By writing a poem as a way to stretch one’s creativity, leadership concepts are explored and encouraged.ObjectiveTo focus participants on the topic of leadership.Giving participants an opportunity to become acquainted and begin working together.Stimulating creative thinking.
 

The Leadership Shield Activity

Through taking part in an art project, leaders recognize their basic values and share them with others, so that participants who will be working together on missions have a greater understanding of each other’s strengths.ObjectiveTo have participants share some of their background information, values, philosophies of life, and leadership experiences.
 

Do you get the idea?

Designed for smaller groups that can process the enormous ideas presented in the leadership training. This is a valuable way for participants to practice through this exercise. “IDEA” is short for Innovation, Development, Enthusiasm, and Application—all ways that the participants can strengthen their teams.
 

Worker Auction

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This is normally a fundraising activity but does bring the added benefit of being great for team building and helps your young people get to know others in the group.A worker auction basically involves auctioning your young people (and leaders) off as workers to the highest bidder. Begin by getting a list of kids and leaders that are willing to auction themselves off.
 

Would You Rather?

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The activity ‘Would you Rather’ is a very simple game – it can be a great time-filler or icebreaker too.The basic idea is you ask a "Would you rather" question (see below for examples) and each person must decide their answer.You can run the game in various formats, depending on the time available and the size of your group.
 
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